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Do you even blog, bro?

November 26, 2018

As I’m drafting advent readings for the upcoming season, it dawns on me that I haven’t updated this blog since . . . well, last advent.

Not that many have really noticed, but here are a few reasons why:

The Priority of ‘IRL’ Ministry. This blog was always intended to serve and supplement my shepherding and teaching ministry in real life (‘IRL’). That is, my primary audience is my congregation at Westgate, and folks in the surrounding area (though it’s been nice to see the Lord use it beyond that scope). In that regard, I’ve noticed two things over the past couple of years: (1) my pastoral and leadership responsibilities at Westgate have left less time and energy for blogging, and (2) this blog is not a particularly effective a platform for our congregation. Hence, less time blogging.

A Reduction of Time Online. Added to that, I’ve tried to reduce the amount of time I’m online over the last year or so. I don’t spend near as much time reading blogs as I used to. Not because there isn’t great content; for whatever reason I’ve spent more time with podcasts. Nothing particularly strategic or intentional to this, but less time reading blogs has also translated into less time blogging.

An Assistant who Oversees Communication at Church. I’ve also been blessed this year by adding an assistant who now oversees our communication at church, including our online presence (i.e., website, social media). In the past, I did a lot of the social media communication, which I no longer have to spend a lot of time thinking about or doing. And less time thinking about using social media to communicate, has meant less time generating content to be communicated. Hence, less blogging.

I still expect to post here from time to time in the future (i.e., see the upcoming advent readings). And I plan to keep the resources here available for the foreseeable future. But for anyone, these are the main reasons for less traffic.

A Reading for Christmas Eve

December 23, 2017

advent-1348639Relight the three purple candles and the pink candle.

Introduction

The word “advent” means coming. Advent is a season of expectation and longing. It’s a time when we prepare to celebrate the arrival of Christ in his incarnation, and a reminder that Christ is coming again to make all things new.

With each candle of Advent this year, we are rehearsing God’s story of redemption. On Christmas Eve we celebrate God’s faithfulness to redeem his creation and save his people by sending his eternal Son, Jesus, into the world.

Scripture

John 1 says:

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things were made through him . . . In him was life, and the life was the light of men. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it. . . . And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth.  (John 1:1-5, 14)

And Jesus says in John 8:

“I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.”  (John 8:12)

Light the white candle in the center.         

We light the final candle of Advent to celebrate the birth of God’s Son, our Savior and King, the true light of the world who gives light and life to all who believe in him.

Prayer

Please pray with me:

Faithful Father,

Thank you that you have not left this world in darkness, but have sent your Son to show us your glory and give us new life. Anchor our hearts in Christ this Christmas, as we follow him and wait for his glorious return, that the earth may be filled with the knowledge of your glory as the waters cover the sea.

Amen.

A Reading for the Fourth Sunday of Advent

December 22, 2017

advent-1348639Relight the first two purple candles, and the pink candle.

Introduction

The word “advent” means coming. Advent is a season of expectation and longing. It’s a time when we prepare to celebrate the arrival of Christ in his incarnation, and a reminder that Christ is coming again to make all things new.

With each candle of Advent this year, we are rehearsing God’s story of redemption. The fourth candle reminds us that sometimes we have to wait for the fulfillment of God’s promises.

Scripture

Psalm 13 says:

How long, O LORD? Will you forget me forever?
How long will you hide your face from me?
How long must I take counsel in my soul and have sorrow in my heart all the day?
How long shall my enemy be exalted over me?
Consider and answer me, O LORD my God;
light up my eyes, lest I sleep the sleep of death.    (Psalm 13:1-3)

And 2 Peter 3 reminds us:

But do not overlook this one fact, beloved, that with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day. The Lord is not slow to fulfill his promise as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing that any should perish, but that all should reach repentance.      (2 Pet. 3:8-9)

Light the last purple candle.           

We light the fourth candle of Advent as we wait with faith for the Lord to answer all his promises in Christ.

Prayer

Please pray with me:

Sovereign Lord,

We confess to you that it is hard to wait. Yet we know in Christ that all your promises are sure. As your ancient people waited centuries for the arrival of their King, give us patience and faith this Advent season, to wait for the light of Christ to dawn again and fulfill your promise to make all things new.

Amen.

A Reading for the Third Sunday of Advent

December 17, 2017

advent-1348639Relight the first two purple candles.

Introduction

The word “advent” means coming. Advent is a season of expectation and longing. It’s a time when we prepare to celebrate the arrival of Christ in his incarnation, and a reminder that Christ is coming again to make all things new.

With each candle of Advent this year, we are rehearsing God’s story of redemption. The third candle reminds us of the promises of God through the Prophets to send light into our dark world.

Scripture

The Prophet Isaiah said:

The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light;
those who dwelt in a land of deep darkness, on them has light shined. . . .
For to us a child is born, to us a son is given;
and the government shall be upon his shoulder,
and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God,
Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.
Of the increase of his government and of peace there will be no end,
on the throne of David and over his kingdom, to establish it and to uphold it
with justice and with righteousness from this time forth and forevermore.
The zeal of the LORD of hosts will do this.

(Isaiah 9:2, 6-7)

Light the pink candle.

We light the third candle of Advent to remember God’s promise to send his Messiah, our Savior and King.

Prayer

Please pray with me:

Merciful Father,

Long ago you said of your Son: “I will make you as a light for the nations, that my salvation may reach to the end of the earth.”*

Thank you for not leaving us in the darkness. Thank you for the promise of your Messiah, our Savior and King, who brings light and joy to all who trust in him. Prepare our hearts to receive him this Advent season.
Amen.

*Isaiah 49:6

A Reading for the Second Sunday of Advent

December 6, 2017

advent-1348639

Relight the first purple candle.

Introduction

The word “advent” means coming. Advent is a season of expectation and longing. It’s a time when we prepare to celebrate the arrival of Christ in his incarnation, and a reminder that Christ is coming again to make all things new.

With each candle of Advent this year, we are rehearsing God’s story of redemption. The second candle reminds us of our need for God’s light due to the darkness of sin.

Scripture

Isaiah 59 says:

Behold, the LORD’s hand is not shortened, that it cannot save,
or his ear dull, that it cannot hear;
but your iniquities have made a separation between you and your God,
and your sins have hidden his face from you so that he does not hear.
For your hands are defiled with blood and your fingers with iniquity;
your lips have spoken lies; your tongue mutters wickedness. . . .
Their feet run to evil, and they are swift to shed innocent blood;
their thoughts are thoughts of iniquity;
desolation and destruction are in their highways.
The way of peace they do not know, and there is no justice in their paths;
they have made their roads crooked; no one who treads on them knows peace.
Therefore justice is far from us, and righteousness does not overtake us;
we hope for light, and behold, darkness, and for brightness, but we walk in gloom.
(Isa. 59:1-3, 7-9)

Light the second purple candle.     

We light the second candle of Advent to lament the darkness of this fallen world, as we wait for the light of Christ to dawn.

Prayer

Please pray with me:

“And this is the judgment: the light has come into the world, and people loved the darkness rather than the light because their deeds were evil.”* Heavenly Father, we lament the darkness that fills this world—the grip that sin has on so many, the pain it causes, and the offense it brings to your holy name. Forgive us our sins, and let the light of your gospel shine into the darkness this Advent season. Amen.

*John 3:19

A Reading for the First Sunday of Advent

November 30, 2017

advent-1348639

Introduction

The word “advent” means coming. Advent is a season of expectation and longing. It’s a time when we prepare to celebrate the arrival of Christ in his incarnation, and a reminder that Christ is coming again to make all things new.

With each candle of Advent this year, we are rehearsing God’s story of redemption. The first candle reminds us of God’s purpose in creation.

Scripture

Genesis 1:1-4 says:

“In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth. The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters. And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. And God saw that the light was good. And God separated the light from the darkness.”

1 John 1:5 says:

“God is light, and in him is no darkness at all.”

And Revelation 4:11 declares:

“Worthy are you, our Lord and God, to receive glory and honor and power, for you created all things, and by your will they existed and were created.”

Light the first purple candle.           

We light the first candle of Advent to remember that God is light, and he made this world to reflect the light of his glory.

Prayer

Please pray with me:

Heavenly Father,

“The earth is the LORD’s and the fullness thereof, the world and those who dwell therein.”* You made this world that you might fill it with the light of your glory. You promised to accomplish your plan and redeem this world by sending the light of your Son. Prepare our hearts to receive him this advent season. “For God, who said, ‘Let light shine out of darkness,’ made his light shine in our hearts to give us the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Christ.”**

Amen.

    *Ps. 24:1; **2 Cor. 4:6

Prayer for Peace and Racial Reconciliation: A Liturgy

August 21, 2017

Eph 2.14 bThe events in Charlottesville, Virginia, a little over a week ago were horrifying. White supremacists marching with torches, Nazi flags paraded down the street, violent outbursts that claimed the life of one woman and injured dozens more. It can only be described as a satanic display of racism and hatred, an offense against God and an assault on people made in his image.

But those events are also indicative of a larger and much deeper problem in American society—one that is not buried in our nation’s history of slavery, segregation, and racial discrimination (as some might like to think), but has continued to poison relationships and systems for decades, and is now finding fresh energy in the alt-right white nationalist movement.

Our Savior weeps over this. And we should too. There is no supreme race; only a Supreme Savior. Racism is an abomination in God’s eyes and antithetical to his gospel. But violence is not the answer either. In times of racial tension and evil, we must rally around the only thing powerful enough to bring true and lasting healing: the cross of Jesus Christ.

For this reason, we gathered last night at Westgate Church to pray. For those who couldn’t join us, or any who wish to seek God in prayer or this critical matter, we’re making available the liturgy we used last night (see below).

The liturgy uses a combination of responsive readings, Scripture readings, and open times of prayer. It begins with an affirmation of God’s glory and majesty, and the beauty of his design for humanity–a diverse yet single humanity, made in his image. Next it moves into a time of lament over the sin of racism in our country’s past and present. This is followed by a time of confession and repentance, both on behalf of our nation, but also personal confession as we ask God to search our hearts and reveal ways we have been part of the problem. The liturgy then moves into the gospel, the assurance that God’s grace through Jesus is the answer to the sin of racism among us and within us. Finally it concludes with a time of supplication and intercession, seeking God’s help for this time of need in our country.

You can download the liturgy here: Prayer Gathering for Peace and Racial Reconciliation.